A regional approach to address the bushmeat problem in Eastern Africa

What you can do

Even if you don’t work for a conservation organization, YOU can make a difference with your voice, knowledge, and purchasing power. Click below on where you live to see the variety of ways you can help in the fight against unsustainable bushmeat practices and how others across the globe continue to make an impact on wildlife conservation.

African Citizens

Global Citizens

Part of an organization? Click here to see how your organization can contribute to addressing bushmeat.

African Citizens

How you can help address the  bushmeat trade in your region:

  •   Support domestic animal production and consumption.
  •   Speak to your family about their consumption and inform them of the risks of eating bushmeat.
  •   Hold meetings in your home villages about wildlife conservation and health risks of wild animal consumption.
  •   Report any suspicious meat in your community to wildlife authorities.
  •  Ask vendors and restaurants what type of meat they are serving and do not eat meat of endangered and threatened species.
  •  Learn about your country’s endangered and threatened wildlife through your Department of Wildlife and Protected Areas, NGOs such as the BEAN or the Bushmeat Crisis Task Force www.bushmeat.org or local and national NGOs.
  •  Be an advocate for the laws that protect your country’s wildlife from being hunted, harmed, eaten or kept as pets.
  •  Keep up with your country’s news, policy and events.
  •  Support local conservation organizations who work on legislation, support, and capacity building of government agencies to address importation of live animals and meat.
  •  Donate here if you want to help BEAN on its efforts to directly work with local partners on capacity building, conservation education, law enforcement, and protein/livelihood alternatives.

To get ideas used by individual citizens who made a difference in their communities on bushmeat, click here

Global Citizens

Bushmeat is a global problem—although much of the bushmeat in East Africa is traded within communities or to larger cities, some of it is transported abroad. These have various consequences for wildlife conservation, including decreasing wildlife populations, reducing ecosystem health, decreasing the effectiveness of protected areas, and increasing the potential for disease outbreaks amongst humans, wildlife, and livestock. It also has negative health implications for importing countries. Bushmeat can carry various diseases and bring them into your communities, including ebola, anthrax, and the like, which can spread quickly in densely populated areas. It is of particular risk in communities with large international populations who long for a taste of ‘home’. Although border security works to fight this, most countries still do not have adequate protection at customs to stop all the importation. Click here for just one of the latest research stories on health implications in the United States, and here for the Bushmeat Crisis Task Force’s page with links to many bushmeat challenges in North America.

How you can help address the bushmeat trade in your region:

  • Learn about endangered species in your country and advocate the laws that protect these animals from being hunted, harmed, eaten or kept as pets.
  • Ask vendors and restaurants what type of meat they are serving and do not eat meat of endangered and threatened species.
  • Learn about Africa’s endangered and threatened wildlife through your Department of Wildlife and Protected Areas, NGOs such as the BEAN or the Bushmeat Crisis Task Force (www.bushmeat.org), or local and national NGOs.
  • Keep up with African news, policy and events. Some helpful news sites include: http://www.allafrica.com and BBC Africa.
  •  Support local conservation organizations in Africa who work on legislation, support, and capacity building of government agencies to address importation of live animals and meat
  •  Donate here if you want to help BEAN on its efforts to directly work with local partners on capacity building, conservation education, law enforcement, and protein/livelihood alternatives.

Tips provided in part by the Bushmeat Crisis Task Force

  • Report any suspicious meat in your community to wildlife authorities
  • Support local conservation organizations in Africa who work on legislation, support, and capacity building of government agencies to address importation of live animals and meat

To get ideas from individual citizens who were able to make a difference in their communities on bushmeat, click here